Executive Nurse Leadership and DNP Programs Overiew

View all blog posts under Doctor of Nursing Practice | View all blog posts under Executive Nurse Leadership | View all blog posts under Webinars

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran, walks potential students through the different degree and certificate options available at Duquesne University in the Executive Nurse Leadership and Healthcare Management and Doctor of Nursing Practice programs.

Webinar Participants: 

  • Mary Kay Loughran, DNP, MHA, RN – Assistant Professor
  • Amanda Schoening – Enrollment Advisor
  • Jamella Lewis – Enrollment Advisor

Transcript

Amanda Schoening:

Good afternoon everyone and thank you for cuing in to our Duquesne University Online Nurse Practitioner program webinar today. We’re going to be discussing our doctorates of nursing practice, both our clinical leadership and executive leadership and healthcare management track as well as the executive nurse leadership and healthcare management track for the MSN and the post master’s certificate program. My name is Amanda Schoening, I’m one of the enrollment advisors here at Duquesne. I’m on the phone today with one of my colleagues [Jamella Lewis 00:00:30] as well as one of our esteemed faculty Dr. Mary Kay Loughran.

Jamella Lewis:

Good afternoon everyone. This is Jamella, one of the enrollment advisors that will be assisting you as we go through today’s presentation regarding our doctor of nursing practice, the two tracks we offer for that as well as our master’s degrees in executive nurse leadership and healthcare management. Dr. Mary Kay Loughran, if you can just take a moment to introduce yourself and tell us a little bit about you and how long you’ve been at Duquesne.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Okay thank you. It’s a pleasure to be with all of you this afternoon. I have been at Duquesne for five years and I started there was an adjunct professor and I worked with second degree students in the clinical arena in the adult world on a [inaudible 00:01:22] unit and I obtained my doctor of nursing practice degree from there and that is when it dawned on me how much I would really love to remain as faculty at Duquesne and continue teaching in the DNP program. So as my luck would have it, I was able to fulfill that dream and I have been a faculty there for the last five years. Prior to that, my background has primarily all been in pediatrics. I was a staff nurse in a children’s hospital and I also held different supervisory positions up to and including the chief nursing executive position for quite … Well, I guess it was at least 14 years. I have totally enjoyed that role and the opportunities that that presented to me and I have brought a lot of those experiences over to my current role as faculty in the DNP program at Duquesne.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. It’s so nice to hear from our faculty and to learn a little bit more about what you bring to the table as faculty and as [inaudible 00:02:47] with the School of Nursing so I certainly appreciate that. To get started, let’s chat a little bit more about the MSN program that’s focused on executive nurse leadership and healthcare management. Now this is one of our newer tracks for the fall. Currently it looks like it’s going to take about two years to complete or six semesters and it’s only 30 credit hours, about 10 courses. I know this is a pretty new track for us because if I remember correctly it works with our School of Business, is that right? We work with them for curriculum development?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Ys. This has been a very exciting collaboration that we are really happy to be able to offer online to our students so the student entering this program, they may have an interest in nursing administration and this is a perfect course for them to come in at a master’s level and be exposed to not just some nursing courses that would talk about quality, evidence-based practice, care of vulnerable populations, et cetera, but they will also get the opportunity to go and take courses directly in the School of Business and learn some of the business acumen that goes along with being in an administrative position, whether it be in nursing or business so I think it’s going to be a wonderful experience for students to take advantage of this.

Jamella Lewis:

That is excellent. We are excited for it as well as we have had students in the past that were very interested in that leadership and management track. What can you tell us about what students should expect to learn in this executive nurse leadership program?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

I think what they’ll learn is they will get an appreciation for evidence-based practice in healthcare settings which involve quality improvement and translation of the research that’s out there now, translating it to the healthcare arena in many different settings, inpatient, outpatient, the community, et cetera, but in addition to that, they will get a focus on what are those business skillsets that they need. They will be looking at human resource, how to work with individuals that they are managing and leading. They will be exposed to financial courses where you learn how to do budgeting, accounting, things along those lines, strategic planning, some of the things that whenever you are in an undergraduate nursing course, we really don’t go into those things. This really provides that opportunity for that prospective student to be exposed to not just nursing but also the business pieces to help them be successful in administration.

Amanda Schoening:

That’s wonderful, and this program too. We don’t have clinical hours associated with this nor do we have a campus visit. This program is really designed for students that are working full-time and looking to make that next step in their career into more of an administrative or leadership role. Is that a statement you would agree with?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Oh, absolutely. I thank you for bringing that up. This really allows a person to kind of … I hate to use this word but it’s kind of they dip their toe into something different. Sometimes nurses think that they want administration. This will allow them to appreciate if they want to pursue in that career path. This will provide them that opportunity and it really does give them a nice number of courses to really figure that out and challenge them in a different way that they probably haven’t been challenged in their regular nursing programs. I think that’s what’s so exciting about it.

Amanda Schoening:

Absolutely. I really couldn’t agree more. With that being said, I think the next step for us is kind of just to discuss the admissions requirements and see what students will need if they should choose to apply and what the process itself looks like. Students looking into this MSN need to hold a current unencumbered registered nursing license. They must also have a bachelor’s degree, either nursing or non-nursing from an accredited college or university though we will say the BSN degree is preferred. As far as the GPA requirement goes, we ask the students have a 3.0 GPA and that they’ve still taken and completed an undergraduate level statistics course with a C or higher. I know that we do have a little bit of freedom there in terms of the undergraduate requirement. Outside of nursing, what other sort of undergraduate degrees do you think would be of benefit to this career path?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Well a person who maybe has an undergraduate degree in … Maybe in business and then chose to go on to become a registered nurse. They didn’t go through a college level program for example but they have a bachelor’s degree in business or in finance or in some programs where taking this master’s degree makes perfect sense to them if they want to then jump into the administrative arena for healthcare. That was a little choppy, I apologize.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. Excellent. No, you were absolutely fine.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

That one threw me a curve ball.

Amanda Schoening:

Now as far as the admissions process goes, so it’s very similar to our other MSN programs. We require that students provide their resume or their curriculum vitae, whatever they have most up to date. We also ask that students provide two letters of reference, ideally one academic and one professional from a nursing supervisor and then also we ask that students provide official transcripts from their previously attended institution and then a professional goal statement as well. Now goal statements here at Duquesne have to be two pages double-spaced, really just elaborating on nursing experience, longterm goals and why students are interested in attending here at Duquesne. Now since this is more of a leadership focused MSN, what are some other important factors or important things they can include in their goal statement to present a stronger application?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

A prospective student would really want to tell their story of what their leadership experience has been. Whenever we would be reading goal statements, we would be looking for a trend in this applicant’s progress where … How he or she started out as a professional nurse, what positions they may have held. For example, what committees they may be involved in or may have been chair of so we would want to see that leadership exposure and experience come through loud and clear in their goal statement. That really gives us a good sense that this person is really thinking through that this administrative or this management is really something that they want to do with their next career move.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for that, Dr. Loughran. We also offer the post certificate, post master’s certificate, the executive nurse leadership and healthcare management. Now this program takes just one year to complete, just six courses, 18 credit hours. How is this program different from the other post master’s certificates that we offer?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Well this post master’s certificate is really focused on management and administration. The other post master’s certificates that have been offered and are offered at Duquesne, they really more or less have a clinical bent to them. This one is purely in that administrative area. It almost shows for this student that achieves this that they have additional information, knowledge, background, interest in the administration, leadership area and it does give them a competitive advantage whenever they are applying for positions within their organization. It shows that they’ve taken that extra step to meet national standards and that really is important. It does help them to stick out among applicants and it also shows that they have a level of competency and are current with what is happening in the nurse leadership and healthcare arena. It’s a good certification for someone who is really focused on a career in this area.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. Very similar to the MSN, students in this program can expect to learn, like you mentioned about more of the administrative side of nursing, more so financial, requirements of business within the nursing and healthcare field as well as human resources aspects and things of that nature. Is there anything else additional that might be the focus of the post master’s certificate that would add on to a nurse’s previous nursing experience or their previous MSN that might be very beneficial for them in the long run?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Yes, I think the fact that these courses that they will be taking are in conjunction with our business school here, it’s going to expose them to the business world which I think is really a nice compliment to what they’re currently doing in their healthcare world. They really will see some things through some different lens that they have been exposed to and I think that increases … Like the depth of their perspective that they may currently hold. I also think that in this course or this certification, they also will be exposed to nursing informatics and data management and everything now in the healthcare arena involves technology and looking at data. I think that the fact that we have that as part of this certification is really important and gives an extra advantage to the student that would be pursuing this. I think those combinations of the informatics piece as well as having these courses be in collaboration with the school of business really gives them a nice advantage in obtaining this certification.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for explaining that. So the admissions requirements for this program, we are looking for students who hold a current unencumbered RN license, hold a bachelor’s degree, nursing or non-nursing from an accredited college or university, the BSN degree is preferred. They also need to hold a MSN degree as well with a minimum of 3.0 GPA requirement and they have to have completed either an undergraduate level statistics course with a C or higher or if they’ve only completed a graduate statistics course that needs to be a B or higher. As far as applying to the program, our students are required to provide us with either a resume or a current CV. There is a professional goals statement involved. They do need two letters of recommendation. Those are submitted electronically through the application itself, one academic and one from their supervisor. Official transcripts from all schools attended and there is the possibility that an interview may be required. Similar to the master’s in executive nurse leadership Dr. Loughran, is there anything that these post master’s students should include in their personal goal statements?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

It really would be similar to what I had mentioned earlier with the master’s degree in executive nurse leadership. You really want to stress the leadership activities and roles that you have held, in the past and currently. Perhaps maybe your goal, where you see your career going. That might be also something to include as it relates to moving forward with a career in leadership for healthcare or nursing or whatever those might be. That will really separate that applicant out if they’re able to show that leadership exposure that they’ve had.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. Thank you so much for sharing that and elaborating on that in just a bit more detail. Now at this point in time I think we’re going to move on to our doctorate of nursing practice. Both the clinical leadership and the executive leadership tracks but for right now let’s focus on the clinical leadership program. The CNP is two years to complete and that’s as a full-time cohort. Classes are only 11 courses during this entire program and they’re about 35 credit hours total. Students also have the opportunity to study abroad and then they can also add a concentration should they choose. We offer concentrations in transcultural nursing, forensic nursing and nursing education. Now Dr. Loughran, could you just elaborate a little bit more on how does a DNP differ from a PhD and which one is right for our students?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

The doctor of nursing practice is really a doctoral degree with nurses that are interested in practice. A lot of our applicants are advanced practice nurses so you will see them as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, nurse midwives, community health nurses and also we do have some nurse executives that can be in this program as well. These students are learning how to really look at translating evidence from research. They do not do research as a PhD in nursing does. What they do is take the results of that research and implement change in their respective organizations. That’s the biggest difference. A DNP will be translating research evidence while a PhD in nursing creates that research that then gets translated. If an applicant is very much interested in translating that research in their healthcare organizations or in their field or specialty field, the DNP is the role for them. If applicants are interested in creating new research, new knowledge, they really want to look at the PhD program and see what is involved in that.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for explaining that. With the DNP in clinical leadership, what do students expect to learn in this program?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Well, in the DNP and clinical leadership, leadership is basically threaded throughout this whole curriculum. What they will learn is they will learn about evidence-based practice, how to look into the research and interpret research. They will put together a project that will involve quality improvement or program evaluation of a change that has taken place in their organization. They also can look at a health policy and do an analysis of that. Those are the three areas where the students’ projects have focused and they will learn how to do this, how to conduct that project. They will learn in addition to product management how to use information technology and data sets to be able to identify where to get that data and how to analyze it and what are the data measures that they should be including in a project in the DNP program. They will actually implement that project in … We have identified two residencies in the program there at the very end of the program where they implement their project and pool together their results and their outcomes and then that is presented to the faculty and staff at Duquesne.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

They have an option also of studying abroad or traveling abroad I should say for their transcultural class. I think that is something that’s very unique to Duquesne where we do provide them the ability to go to the Rome or the Ireland campus and they really get an opportunity to immerse themselves into another culture and look at that culture and how their healthcare system is delivered. There is a lot that goes on in the two years that they’re there and it really is a wonderful program that our students get exposed to and I think they would agree with that as well.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. Thank you so much for sharing that Dr. Mary Kay Loughran. One kind of follow-up question about the study abroad option itself, what will students specifically be doing? Will they be taking any classes abroad? Will they be working in a health facility? What does that look like for them?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

What that involves for them is they will be taking a course. It is our transcultural and global perspectives course and whenever we go abroad, we are not able to do hands-on care. That’s just what the different countries request. What we are offered is the ability to observe and we just observe the different types of healthcare that are provided in that country and for example in Italy there is a national health system and there is a private health system and there are community services that are provided and the students get an opportunity to see all that and observe that. At the same time, they will be provided experiences of what it is like to live in a different country. There will be some exposure to some of the landmarks there, some of the customs of the people that live there in that country and overall it really gives you a nice immersion experience in that country and their healthcare system.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for giving an insight. I can’t tell you from the students that I have spoken with, they are very excited about the study abroad opportunities and it definitely is something that sets us apart in the words of students from the other ones that they are looking at so a lot of students, they’re really excited about that. I know previously you mentioned working with faculty mentors. Could you explain a little bit about how they are assigned a faculty mentor as well as exactly what the role of the faculty mentor will be as they work through their DNP practice projects?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Oh sure. The faculty mentor is assigned to the student whenever they come to doctor orientation. The process of assignment involves looking at the nature of the DNP project that the student is interested in pursuing and then matching them up with an individual that either has that background or has had experience in doing similar projects so they can be a good resource for that student. This faculty mentor will stay with the student the entire way through the project and they really are there as a resource, as a champion for the DNP student, to help them with their project and to see it successfully completed. It’s a nice relationship that’s developed over the two years that the student is in the program.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for explaining that.

Amanda Schoening:

I think the next question that we have is we’ve discussed a little bit about the sort of students that we look for in this program and oftentimes students that come in are APRNs. What sort of students come in to the program that might not be APRN? Is this program the best fit for them if they come from a non APRN background?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Yes. I really think that we are one of the few programs that do look beyond the advanced practice nurse for the doctor of nursing practice degree. We do have applicants from an educational background and they are looking to pursue getting their doctoral degree and what we would look at in those students with that background is do they hold any type of leadership experience and that could be as a chair of a committee within their school. They could be the director of their simulation lab or they could be sometimes the chair of a standing committee within their school of nursing. We still look for that leadership piece. I would like to stress that part of it because our DNP program does expose them to some leadership opportunities throughout the curriculum. Mostly that education background can be, definitely, considered as a student in our DNP program. We would welcome that.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. That’s always good to hear as well. So now I think we’re going to move on to more of the requirements of this program, what we look for in terms of the application process as well as the next steps for students to take should they choose to apply. I want to talk a little bit more about that so right now for students that are interested in the DNP program, they need to hold a current unencumbered RN license and they also need to have their bachelor’s in science and nursing from an accredited college or university with a 3.0 GPA or higher and then they must also have a master’s degree either in non-nursing or nursing from an accredited college or university with at least again a 3.0 GPA or higher. Now again with the statistics requirement, if you come from an undergraduate course, you can have a C or higher or a graduate course and have a B or higher and then as far as the admissions process itself goes, we do ask that students present a resume or a curriculum vitae as well as three references, official transcripts, and possibly an interview.

Amanda Schoening:

Now last but not least we also ask that students have a two to three page goal statement just talking a little bit more about their background and what they’re looking to do longterm and also kind of covering what they want to do in their practice project. Could you tell us a little bit more about what students should include in regards to what they’re thinking about for the practice project?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Sure. I would be happy to do that for you. Their practice project should be something that they’re very passionate about because they’re going to be doing this for the next two years and that’s a big commitment in anybody’s lifetime. It could be something that is within their workplace. It can be a community setting. It could be a health policy that they are interested in pursuing. We appreciate that they are not going to be implementing the health policy but predominantly what that would involve is really analyzing maybe a current policy or why there should be a health policy in that arena and they would go down that path as part of their DNP project. Their goal statement should let the reader know that they have given this some thought and that they have a focus. They don’t have to necessarily say here is exactly what I’m going to do. We will help them through the process when they are in the DNP program, but they should have a good idea of the area of concentration that they would like to do and then we will help them fine tune whenever they come into the DNP program. As clear as they can be and as articulate as they can be about that, that would really set them apart whenever we read their goal statements.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for clearing that up and giving them some advice on what to include in their personal goal statements. It’s always according to the applicant one of the toughest parts of the application that they have a hard time with writing it so I think that will offer them some assistance. Before we move on to the other two tracks of the DNP, the clinical hours associated with the clinical leadership DNP program, can you explain a little bit about what that entails for our students?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

I’m sorry, could you repeat that again because I didn’t hear that?

Jamella Lewis:

Sure. I was just saying with the clinical hours associated with the DNP program, can you just explain a little bit about what that entails for our students?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Sure. In order to achieve the doctor of nursing practice degree, you have to achieve 1,000 clinical hours. If a student comes into the DNP program and is an advanced nurse practitioner, they are automatically awarded 500 hours because we know right up front that in order to achieve their degree as a nurse practitioner, they have completed that many hours if not more. Only 500 hours are allowed to be brought over per the standard guidelines. If you are not an advanced nurse practitioner, we can look at your transcript and the master’s degree that you did achieve and we can see where you may have had some clinical hours in your master’s program and we would ask that there be a letter from the school where you achieved your master’s degree validating that you did indeed achieve x number of hours in these certain courses in your program and that it would be then your starting point.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

We have had students come with as low a number as 120 hours all the way up to those advanced practice nurses that have 500 hours that they were able to bring over. Then during the coursework that they’re doing, some of the courses have hours associated with them and they … I believe that is approximately 300 hours that they can achieve in just doing the coursework in getting their project pool together. Then as I had mentioned earlier, we have our two [inaudible 00:32:58] courses that they have doing their project, implementing it and then evaluating and disseminating the results. There are also hours awarded there, but again, that is specific to the project that the student is doing. At this juncture, we have never ever had a person have trouble achieving their 1,000 hours. Again this is where the faculty mentor and the DNP student will work together to make sure that they’re on track to doing that. Overall we have found our students really do not have an issue completing that 1,000 hour requirement.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. That’s really good to know and I appreciate you elaborating on that in even more detail. Now oftentimes with this, students do ask the question, is this degree something that’s doable while working full-time as a nurse? They hear 1,000 hours and it can be a little daunting and I know a lot of the hours are integrated in the coursework and the research project itself. Is this something where we often see students finish the program while working full-time or maintaining a large amount of hours at work or is this something similar to our nurse practitioner routes where students may have to drop to a PRN shift or schedule?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

You know what? That’s a great question and I really think that that is depending upon the role that that student is playing in their organization. Some students have worked full-time and have completed this degree and never missed a beat and other students have found it necessary to go into like a part-time position or a casual position. I really think that it is dependent upon the student and what would work best for them. I will tell you that we have had students that have worked full-time. We have had nurse executives in this program who have gone through and successfully achieved it so it is doable. I guess that’s my message. That’s the light at the end of the tunnel, but I think that would have to be a personal decision for the student and how best they feel they can achieve a DNP degree and balance work along with it as well as their family obligations that they may have. We are always more than happy to talk with them about that and help them with that decision if necessary.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. Thank you so much for elaborating on that. I know that’s a pretty big concern we hear often but it’s reassuring to hear that we do have students that are able to go through the program full-time, that is something we’re willing to work with them on and make sure that it’s in their best interest, make sure that it’s the right fit for them.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Yeah, and let me just add one other thing that might be beneficial for prospective students. Our program, we have courses … It’s a combination of eight week and 16 week courses. Whenever a student is taking in their fall and their spring semester the courses are eight week courses so they will only have one course for eight weeks and then when that eight week period is up, then their second eight week course will begin. The focus is truly for that eight weeks on one course. Now when they get to their residencies where they’re actually implementing their projects, they will be full 16 week courses so that may be a little different for them having only one course for that 16 weeks. In the summer semesters, all the courses are 12 weeks. I know it sounds like a lot of movement and going around but I think it’s important for students to know that in some semesters they will really be doing two class courses but they’re each eight weeks. I think that does make a difference. The students have really liked that because they said that it allows them to focus just on that content and they find that that’s doable. I just wanted to pass that along too that it is not that they’re taking two classes entirely the whole 16 weeks that they’re in the program.

Amanda Schoening:

Absolutely. Thank you. Thank you for sharing that as well. Now I do want to move on to the next two DNP programs that we’re starting this fall actually for Fall 2020 and those are the DNPs with an executive nurse leadership focus. Now we have the two options, the first being a post bachelor’s executive nurse leadership and healthcare management DNP, which will take approximately four years to complete and is 20 courses long or 62 credit hours. This program also has the opportunity to study abroad in Rome or in Ireland and then our second newest program is going to be the postmaster’s executive nurse leadership and healthcare management DNP which follows a similar format to the clinical DNP which is going to be two years to complete 11 courses and 35 credit hours. Could you just tell us a little bit more about what this curriculum is going to entail in terms of what students are going to be studying in each of these programs and what that sort of looks like from more of a student perspective versus the clinical leadership track?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Okay, so the biggest difference in these two tracks from the clinical leadership track is that these students are going to be exposed to those business courses that I had referenced whenever we talked about the master’s degree in the executive nurse leadership curriculum. They will be taking their business courses in the School of Business, so that collaboration with the school will be invoked in this program where that does not occur in our clinical leadership program. They will be with students in the clinical leadership DNP program for those core courses in nursing that we will be teaching with respect to evidence-based practice, ethics, [inaudible 00:39:55] policy, information technology and data management, analytical methods, but where they will then take a different path is they will be moving and taking courses in the School of Business that talk about budgeting and finance, business strategic planning, human resource management and programs that are really focused more for that administrative leader that they are looking to become within their organization.

Jamella Lewis:

Excellent. Thank you so much Dr. Loughran. Now can you just explain a little bit for our students the biggest differences between our DNP in clinical leadership as well the executive nurse leadership? I know you touched a little bit just about what students can expect in the executive nurse leadership but if you can just touch base on the differences between the two, that would be great.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Okay. I think that the biggest differences that I see, the clinical leadership DNP is focused on that. It is being a leader in the clinical arena at the bedside or in academia and you are a person that is in a role that is allowing you to make change based upon evidence-based practice within your clinical world. For example, as a nurse practitioner, you may be working in a hospital setting with a specialty group or you might be having your own primary care clinic out in the community. You will be equipped with the skills to be able to keep current with what is happening and to implement any findings that would be required to improve the patient outcomes that you are working with. You can be at a local level, a regional level or a system level in making those changes. Whenever you look at a DNP that has an executive nurse leadership background, this student more than likely is already in a leadership role in their organization and they are looking to advance their career. They are going to get additional skills that will expand their education in the world of nursing but in addition to that they will also expand their education in the world of business. This additional education will allow them to move up the ladder in an organization in getting this degree.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Just trying to think of some examples. This might be a director of nursing that may be interested in becoming a senior director or a chief nursing executive. We also have many nurses who are CNOs who want to become CEOs or chief human resource executives. They want to get in to what’s technically called out there the C suite. This degree would enable them to do that. It would be a nice stepping stone to have this qualification if that is the career path they want to end up going.

Jamella Lewis:

Excellent. Thank you so much for explaining that and the differences between the clinical nurse leadership and the executive nurse leadership track. For example if there was a student who perhaps … They had their BSN and they are licensed and they did … Let’s just say maybe an MBA degree. Would the executive nurse leadership be a good route for them if they are looking to get their DNP?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Yes. I would say yes. Having their MBA, they probably are going to be a little more familiar with the business courses that are offered but what they would not have is the doctorate of nursing practice nursing course that they would be involved in learning in the DNP program. They could easily marry up the education they already have and expand that by going into the DNP program for the executive nurse leader.

Jamella Lewis:

Excellent. Thank you so much. Do the students who are enrolling in this DNP program, will they have a practice project as well to complete?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Oh yes. Yes, absolutely. They will have to do a DNP project as we call it and more than likely I would say that their project will probably be in an administrative capacity as opposed to a clinical change. They are probably going to be looking at something that is an indicator in the management role that they probably are currently occupying. That’s what I have seen taking place.

Jamella Lewis:

Perfect. So they will still have those two campus visits, be assigned a faculty mentor and it will be a total of 100 clinical hours as well?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Yeah, they’ll still [inaudible 00:45:38]

Jamella Lewis:

[inaudible 00:45:39] 1,000.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

I was just going to say, it will be 1,000 hours. They still have to complete all of that, yes.

Jamella Lewis:

Perfect. Thank you so much.

Amanda Schoening:

With that all being said, what sort of projects will the students be looking to complete comparatively to the clinical leadership program? Will these projects be more so focused on widespread policy change or be more so focused on healthcare management aspects? What sort of projects are we looking for?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Well, I think for these students … I’ll just give you some examples of what some of our students have done and are doing. They may be looking … In the hospitals now, the insurance carriers have decided to not pay for hospital acquired infections. One of those infections might be pneumonia so many days after discharge and they bounce back into the organization. One student did a whole project on analyzing that and setting up a rehab program for these patients that were high risk or that bounced back and encouraging them to be part of this program to see if it made a difference in whether or not they came back as a readmission to the hospital. It was more of a financial and patient outcome project that she did.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Another example of a project might be how to improve nursing satisfaction as well as patient satisfaction and one student put together a simulation that actually the nurses had to participate in as the nurse and then as the patient and see what that felt like and then monitored the patient and nurse satisfaction through surveys that they do and see what was the impact of that simulation. Because again, depending upon the state where the students come from, they receive financial incentives based upon their satisfaction scores or their patient experience scores. Those are just two ideas of projects that I have seen and these individuals doing it were at a chief nursing executive level that did that. That’s just a couple ideas but it kind of gives you a perspective of … They’re looking at the whole system or the whole division when they’re doing some of these projects and trying to make an impact on it for their organization.

Amanda Schoening:

Excellent. Thank you so much for elaborating on that. Now I think … Now it’s kind of time to lean into the admissions requirements as well as the admissions process for these two different degrees. The first slide here is for the post bachelor’s executive nurse leadership DNP. This is for students who only hold their bachelor’s degree either in nursing or a non-nursing major. To qualify for this program, you must hold a current encumbered RN license. You must have that bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with at least a 3.0 GPA and you also have to complete an undergraduate level statistics course with a C or higher. Ideally we also want our students to have at least one year of full-time experience as an RN prior to registration in the specialty coursework. Now for the admissions process, students do need to provide their resume or their curriculum vitae as well as three electronically submitted references, official transcripts, and then of course their goal statement which should be about two to three pages, double spaced, just detailing what they’ve done as a nurse, what they’re looking to do in their future career, why they’re interested in attending here at Duquesne and then talking as well about their practice project idea. Now since this is a program that’s focused more so on executive nurse leadership, is it beneficial for our students to have previous leadership experience and if so what does that look like?

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Yes. I do think given that it’s an executive nurse leadership program, it is beneficial to show that they have experience in leading. Now this is a post bachelor’s executive nurse leadership so these students may not have the opportunity to be in leadership roles but for these individuals, they may have been the president of their nursing school or their nursing class in their undergraduate school that they attended as an example, or they may have head up their student chapter of their student state nursing association. These students should show that they are interested in pursuing leadership roles. Some of them for example might already be clinical leaders in their organizations or fulfill charge nurse responsibilities on a regular basis. We would be looking for prospective students that are showing this pathway that they are leaders and they have handled responsible positions and their ultimate goal they would define as becoming a nurse manager, a nurse executive or a hospital executive. Where is that they see their career path going? They should be able to articulate that in their goal statement.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much for explaining that, and for our post master’s executive nurse leadership DNP students, they are required to hold a current unencumbered RN license, a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with a 3.0 GPA or higher, as well as a master’s degree, nursing or non-nursing as well from an accredited college or university with a 3.0 GPA or higher, the MSN degree is preferred, and they have to have completed an undergraduate statistics course with a C or higher and if they’ve only completed a graduate course it should be with a B or higher. For applying to the program, it is required to have your resume or curriculum vitae, two to three pages professional goal statement as well as three electronically submitted references and of course official transcripts from all schools attended. It is important to note that an interview may be required as well.

Amanda Schoening:

I believe that is all we truly have for today in terms of our new DNP tracks, our clinical leadership program and the executive nurse leadership and healthcare management master’s and post master’s certificate degree. I do want to just say thank you so much Dr. Loughran for taking the time to go over these programs with us today. I know this information is priceless to our students and it’s much appreciated by us here in the enrollment department so we’re glad we got the chance to speak with you to provide some more details here and if you as a student have any questions about any of these programs or any of the other programs that we offer feel free to reach out to your enrollment advisor whether it’s myself or Jamella or any other of our colleagues, you can give us a call at 888-305-5749, extension 5344 for myself or 5314 for Jamella. Thank you again.

Jamella Lewis:

Thank you so much Dr. Loughran.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

Thank you very much.

Dr. Mary Kay Loughran:

My pleasure. Any time. Thank you so much for your assistance.